Behind Closed Doors:
What Curry County 8th and 11th Graders Say

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Data Compiled and Report Prepared by
Gordon Clay
http://bit.ly/1UaiVG7

February, 2016

 

Behind Closed Doors

www.TheCitizensWhoCare.org

Report short-cut: http://bit.ly/1UaiVG7

A Hopeful Future
8:41
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New Movie Is Neither Liberal
Nor Conservative
Michael Moore with Annette Insdorf
Michael Moore Talks at Google
Trailer: Who to invade next?

Background
Executive Summary

Excerpt

Information
Related issues: 
Bullying, Zero Tolerance
Oregon Healthy Teens Survey Frequently Asked Questions
2016 Student Wellness Survey
The Data Difference: The data user’s guide: Using data for better decisions - 30 page pdf
Publications using Oregon Youth Risk Survey Data
Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) Release date June-July, 2016
Charts:

Oregon Healthy Teen/Wellness Surveys - Curry County - 2010/2015 - 6th/8th/11th Grades http://www.thecitizenswhocare.org/schoolboard/healthyteen-wellness-county-comparison-bully.html or http://bit.ly/1RYUHex

Oregonn Healthy Teen/Wellness Surveys - Curry County - 2010/2015 - 6th/8th/11th Grades http://www.thecitizenswhocare.org/schoolboard/healthyteen-wellness-county-comparison-composite.html or http://bit.ly/1poPrYJ (next best county)

2015 Oregon Healthy Teen Survey: 

Healthy Teen Survey Questions - http://www.thecitizenswhocare.org/schoolboard/healthy-teen-survey-questions.html or http://bit.ly/22g7BcP

Bullying, Harassment, Intimidation & Cyberbullying http://www.thecitizenswhocare.org/schoolboard/oregon-county-chart-healthy-teen.html or http://bit.ly/1RYSb84

Suicide Ideation/Violence
http://www.thecitizenswhocare.org/schoolboard/oregon-county-chart-healthy-teen-2.html or http://bit.ly/1TZEoSy

2014 Oregon Wellness Survey: 

Oregon Wellness Survey Questions - http://www.thecitizenswhocare.org/schoolboard/student-wellness-survey-questions.html or http://bit.ly/22g7LRH

Bullying, Harassment, Intimidation & Cyberbullying http://www.thecitizenswhocare.org/schoolboard/oregon-county-chart-student-wellness.html or http://bit.ly/22gTbJt

Suicide Ideation/Violence
http://www.thecitizenswhocare.org/schoolboard/oregon-county-chart-student-wellness-2.html or http://bit.ly/1WlYIe9


Background


March is girls sports month and a reminder of the time over three years ago when a number of girls who played basketball for Brookings-Harbor asked for help and were ignored by the district. It's also the month four years ago when Dorothy Schull passed away.

The silence from the district and board regarding bullying is deeply fustrating to many parents, students and other community members.

Back at the December 16, 2015 board meeting, I reported my concern over the dramatic increase in suicide ideation last year by our students in the 2015 Healthy Teen Survey. I had asked at that time that the board and district consider implementing OSBA school board policy JHH concerning steps to take with suicide sitsuations. (I understand that a teacher, recently, felt that they had someone who was suicidal and not knowing what to do, waited until the break between classes to report it after the child had left the classroom and gone into the general population.)

I'm a data guy and I thought I should let you know what I've uncovered since. I was doing a project for another entity. It used student's answers to a short list of question concerning bullying, violence and suicidality which I have been tracking since 2010. I developed a chart showing that same information for all Oregon counties. The initial purpose was to provide information in one place that officials could look at to see how their counties compared.

An unintended consequence of that process, I was noticing, question after question, where Curry County 8th graders were ranking well above Oregon state averages. In digging further I found that they were number one in the state in 12 of 14 categories and number 2 in those other two and 11th graders were number one in 2 categories, number 2 in two and 5th in three others. (See http://bit.ly/1RYUHex )

Executive Summary


"2X" signifies that twice the Oregon average was reached by Curry County students.

  • Answering the question, have you been harassed in the 30 days before the survey, over 50% said Curry County 8th graders answered yes. Columbia County was the closest with 39.2%
  • Harassed because they were perceived gay, lesbian, bisexul, transgender 2x
  • Harassed because of weight, clothres, acne, physical characteristic 2x Also 2nd for 11th graders
  • Your group of friends 2x 5th for 11th graders
  • Cyberbullying: Email, IM, texting, phone, chat rooms, sites
  • Other reasons 2x 5th for 11th graders
  • Missed at least 1 day of school-not feel safe
  • Was in a physical fight on school property 5th for 11th graders
  • Threatened with a weapon on school grounds 2x

2nd place

  • Race or ethnic origin
  • Unwanted sexual comments or attention 2x

Suicidality - 8th and 11th graders

  • Did you ever feel so sad or hopeless almost every day for two weeks or more in a row that you stopped doing some usual activities? Both 1st
  • Did you ever seriously consider attempting suicide? both 1st.
  • How many times did you actually attempt suicide? 8th 1st, 11th 2nd Both 2X
  • From 2013 - If you attempted suicide, did any attempt result in an injury, poisoning, or overdose that had to be treated by a doctor or nurse? 2.8% of 8th graders, 0.9% of 11th graders.

Potential Upstanders - 2014

And finally, an aea of real potential. Converting bystanders to upstanders. An upstander is someone who sees bullying going on and says something like "Stop, that's not cool." If a second bystander chimes in it almost always stops the bullying in less than ten seconds.

From the 2014 report, there were a lot of potential 6th, 8th and 11 grade Upstanders:

  • 68 to 79% said they heard a student bully another student
  • 48 to 64% said they saw a student hit, kick, punch, hurt another student
  • 65 to 74% said they heard another student spread mean rumors about another student

Do all of your staff members understand the tell tale signs of bullying, suicide ideation, inhalation and cutting issues? When they do recognize what's happening, do they understand what steps to take? I would bet that there isn't one middle or high school student in Curry County, Oregon who doesn't know a cutter.

Don't continue to make excuses to do nothing. The truth can be denied but not avoided.

Information


Program Design and Evaluation Services

Oregon Healthy Teens (OHT) is Oregon's effort to monitor the health and well-being of adolescents. An anonymous and voluntary research-based survey, OHT is conducted among 8th and 11th graders statewide. The OHT survey incorporates two youth surveys that preceded it, the YRBS and the Student Drug Use Survey.

Why does Oregon conduct the Oregon Healthy Teens survey?

OHT is fundamental to ensuring that young people arrive at adulthood with the skills, interests, assets, and health habits needed to live healthy, happy, and productive lives in caring relationships with other people. The information gathered in this survey enables schools and communities to know what proportion of their young people are developing successfully and what proportion is having problems. It allows them to assess whether the things they are doing are improving outcomes for young people.

How does the survey make a difference in youth health and well-being?

Over the past 20 years, research has identified an increasing number of effective approaches to preventing these problems. These include programs and policies that support families, school practices, media interventions, and neighborhood and community-wide efforts. Accurate estimates of the extent of youth problems are essential for knowing which schools and communities need which programs and whether the programs, when implemented, are working.

Oregon Healthy Teens monitors the factors that influence successful development. Research has shown that risk factors and assets that affect young people include family, school, neighborhood, and community characteristics. By measuring these influences as well as youth behavior, the OHT survey provides information to help schools and communities focus on the things that are most important to ensure successful youth development. As we develop a system for monitoring youth well-being, we will become better and better able to ensure that the largest possible proportion of young people achieve its full potential.

What topics are included in the survey?

  • Tobacco, alcohol and other drug use
  • Access to tobacco and alcohol
  • Personal safety behaviors and perceptions
  • Violence?related behaviors
  • Diet and exercise
  • Extracurricular activities
  • Sexual activity and HIV/AIDS knowledge
  • Health conditions and access to care
  • Individual, peer, community and family influences on risk behaviors
  •  

How are the rights of families protected?

In the weeks prior to the survey, parents/guardians receive a letter asking permission for their student to fill out the questionnaire. The parent or guardian is given the option to refuse consent. In addition, each student has the option to decline the survey, or to skip any question they don't want to answer.

How is the confidentiality of the student protected?

The OHT survey is anonymous; students are not asked for their names. Once the surveys have been completed and collected, there is no identifying information linking a questionnaire to an individual student or parent. In addition, the information reported to the school district is aggregated-it is grouped by grade level and gender, and no individual set of information is identified in these reports.

How long have school-based surveys been used for statewide health monitoring in Oregon?

Historically, two agencies in the Department of Human Services administered two school-based youth surveys on alternating years Oregon: the CDC-based Youth Risk Behavioral Survey (YRBS), administered in odd-numbered years since 1991, and the Student Drug Use survey (including Risk and Protective factor information) in even-numbered years since 1996. While each survey provided data on part of the key indicators for many state and national strategic assessments and plans, a more coordinated approach was needed to help develop consistent, yearly tracking of key indicators, and increase the usefulness of data to local communities and schools.

How do state agencies, local health departments, schools, and other groups use the survey data?

OHT data are used to help evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of projects and programs that promote healthy adolescence in Oregon. They are a key source of state and national leading health indicators, such as those included in the Oregon Benchmarks and Healthy People 2010.

Survey findings serve as a valuable tool for legislators and other policy makers as they make decisions about health related policies, services, programs, and educational activities. Agencies, non-profit organizations, and community groups use the data to provide base-line and evaluation information required for grants and other funding sources, and for planning and evaluating activities and programs that promote health and ability to learn, prevent injury, and reduce high risk behaviors among youth. Many Oregon counties and local communities use OHT survey information in community health assessments.

Many schools and communities use the results from this survey in the process of obtaining Safe and Drug Free Schools funding and other grants to enhance local prevention resources. Obtaining such funding relies on the proven strategy of being able to demonstrate need and provide accountability by measuring outcomes.

Parents, school staff members, and community groups can use the information to identify areas where help is most needed for students to change behavior, and they can use that opportunity to develop and support activities and environments that encourage healthy behaviors.

How do I see the survey questions or results?

All OHT reports going back to 1997, including questionnaires and data tables, are available on our data page.
Source::
public.health.oregon.gov/BirthDeathCertificates/Surveys/OregonHealthyTeens/Pages/background.aspx

Oregon Healthy Teens Survey Frequently Asked Questions


  • What is the goal of Oregon Healthy Teens?
  • Are sensitive questions asked?
  • Does asking questions about a behavior encourage that behavior?
  • Kids don't always tell the truth, how do we know results are accurate?
  • How will my family’s privacy be protected?
  • Will any students be tracked and surveyed again to see how their behavior changes?
  • How is the OHT Survey Developed?
  • Who Participates in OHT?
  • What Does OHT Measure?
  • How Are OHT Data Used?
  • Is student participation anonymous? How is student privacy protected?
  • How long does it take to fill out the questionnaire? Is there some sort of physical test?
  • Are the questionnaire and consent letter provided in other languages?
  • Is OHT related to the “No Child Left Behind” mandates?
  • How do parents find out about OHT?
  • When is the survey conducted? When are results available?

What is the goal of Oregon Healthy Teens?

Healthy students have better attendance, get higher grades and test score and are less likely to skip school, drop out or engage in risky behaviors. The Oregon Healthy Teens Survey is a comprehensive, school-based, anonymous and voluntary survey that is a key part of a state-wide effort to help local schools and communities ensure that all Oregon youth are healthy and successful learners who contribute positively to their communities.

OHT provides schools, communities, and our state with a clearer picture of youth strengths and problems. The OHT Survey allow schools and communities to find out what prevention efforts are working and which need improvement, with a particular emphasis on tobacco prevention. Our goal is to do what the name says: give our teens the support they need to live healthy lives. State and local agencies depend on OHT to assess youth needs, develop comprehensive plans and prevention programs, solicit funding, and measure outcomes.

Are sensitive questions asked?

Our goal is to reduce those behaviors among high school and middle school students that adversely affect their health and ability to learn. Some questions may be considered sensitive. AIDS, HIV infection, and other sexually transmitted diseases are major health problems. Sexual intercourse and intravenous drug use are among the behaviors known to increase the risk of HIV or other STDs. The only way to determine if adolescents are at risk in these areas is to ask questions about these behaviors. Mental health, attempted suicide, harassment, tobacco, alcohol and other drug use, and weapon carrying may be considered sensitive topics.

Questions are age appropriate and are presented in a straightforward and sensitive manner. Students can also choose to not answer any question that may make them uncomfortable.

Does asking questions about a behavior encourage that behavior?

No. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) states that there is no evidence that simply asking students about health risk behaviors will encourage them to try that behavior.

In addition, asking sensitive questions can bring good news, such as recent Oregon Healthy Teens findings that show a reduction in sexual activity and tobacco use among Oregon teens.

Kids don't always tell the truth, how do we know results are accurate?

Protecting student confidentiality and anonymity is paramount. Students must see the survey as important and know that procedures are in place to protect their privacy and anonymity. Studies have shown that surveys such as OHT give more accurate results than those where students believe their answers can be traced (and so are more likely to say what they think we want to hear). Survey data from adolescents is as reliable as data collected from adults. Internal reliability checks help identify and remove the small percentage of students who falsify answers.

How will my family’s privacy be protected?

This survey is anonymous. Survey administration procedures are designed to protect student privacy and allow for anonymous participation. Students will not put their names or other identifying information on the questionnaires or answer sheets. When the surveys have been completed and collected, we will have no identifying information linking a questionnaire to an individual student or parent. Summary information across grade levels will be reported to the school district.

Will any students be tracked and surveyed again to see how their behavior changes?

No. Although an individual student might participate again in future years, it will be impossible to track individual students who participate because no identifying information will be collected.

How is the OHT Survey Developed?

The Oregon Healthy Teens Survey was designed and is conducted as a collaborative effort by the Oregon Department of Education and Oregon Healthy Authority. Creating a single public health statewide system for getting a scientifically accurate picture of youth development helps reduce costs and redundancies sometimes associated with the multiple school assessments conducted in the past, and provides schools and their communities with a better opportunity to use the information for longer-term planning and evaluation of their efforts to improve youth outcomes.

Who Participates in OHT?

Surveys are administered in odd-numbered years to Oregon’s 8th and 11th grade students. OHT receives completed surveys from students across the entire state, totaling more than over 30,000 Oregon adolescents in 2008 and 16,000 in 2009.

What Does OHT Measure?

OHT focus areas include:

  • tobacco, alcohol and other drug use and access to substances
  • physical activity, nutrition and body weight
  • sexual risk behaviors that can result in HIV infection, other sexually transmitted diseases, and unintended pregnancies
  • mental health concerns such as suicidal ideation, depression, harassment, and body image
  • behaviors that may result in intentional (violence and suicide) and unintentional injury (motor vehicle crashes),
  • health care access, use of school-based health centers, and screening for conditions such as asthma
  • basic demographics.

How Are OHT Data Used?

Data are used to help evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of projects and programs that promote healthy adolescence in Oregon. OHT data are a key source of state and national leading health indicators and outcome measures, such as those included in the Oregon Legislative Benchmarks and Healthy People 2010. Many Oregon counties and local communities use OHT survey information in community health assessments. Agencies, non-profit organizations, and community groups use the data to provide base-line and evaluation information required for grants and other funding sources, and for planning and evaluating activities and programs that promote health and ability to learn, prevent injury, and reduce high risk behaviors among youth.

Is student participation anonymous? How is student privacy protected?

Survey administration procedures are designed to protect student privacy and allow for anonymous participation. The survey is proctored by classroom teachers, who are given training materials on the survey protocol. Students submit a completed optically scannable survey, containing no personal identifiers, which is then placed in one envelope for the entire class. Students not participating in the survey are provided with an alternative activity by their school, usually outside of the classroom. Aggregated reports sent to schools and districts are based on the all students participating, so anonymity of students is preserved.

How long does it take to fill out the questionnaire? Is there some sort of physical test?

One class period is needed for administration of the self-administered questionnaire. It takes approximately 5 minutes for the survey administrator to distribute survey materials and read directions to the students. It then takes approximately 40 minutes for students to record their responses. No physical test or exam is involved.

Are the questionnaire and consent letter provided in other languages?

Currently, we can provide Spanish hard copies of the survey and consent letter, which schools can distribute to students not fluent in English.

Is OHT related to the “No Child Left Behind” mandates?

The focus of No Child Left Behind is on the improvement of students in academic areas. The NCLB section, Title IV-A, Safe and Drug Free Schools, requires school districts to collect data around student alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use as well as issues around violence. If funds from U.S. Department of Education (including NCLB) are used for surveys, it requires active parental permission, which is not the approach used by the Oregon Healthy Teens Survey.

Program planning and support for increasing the health and well-being of students helps those students to be ready and able to learn once they are in the classroom. Schools are generally interested in having a healthy student-body that is able to focus on their education when they are in the classroom setting.

How do parents find out about OHT?

Oregon uses an “active notification” with a “passive permission/ passive consent” model for parents. OHT requires that participating schools actively notify the parents of selected students. A letter is sent to the home of each student in the selected grade, either via a mailed letter or email, to inform the parents or guardians of the upcoming survey and give parents a chance to find out more about the survey. The state coalition for OHT suggests that each school make a physical copy of the survey available in either the main office or the counseling office, where parents could visit and view the survey.

If the school does not hear from a parent, the survey protocol assumes permission is given by the parent for their student to take the survey. If a parent does not wish their child to participate in the survey, they are asked to complete and return the parental notification form to the school to opt their student out of the survey. Schools are asked to have an alternate site and activity for those students - while their classmates take the survey. Parents can also tell their child not to take the survey. Students can also opt out of the survey on their own even if the parent had not explicitly asked them not to participate. The survey is voluntary, which is stated at the bottom of each page in the survey form.

When is the survey conducted? When are results available?

The most current "Wellness" survey was conducted in 2013. Read the State Report (pdf).

Source: public.health.oregon.gov/BirthDeathCertificates/Surveys/OregonHealthyTeens/Pages/aboutoht.aspx

2015 Healthy Teen Survey


Why should your school participate

Results for the 2015 OHT survey are available by county as PDF files. Districts and schools from every county, except Josephine, Wallowa and Wheeler, participated in this year's survey. Due to relatively small sample sizes, the following counties were combined for more robust results:

Sherman/Gilliam/Wasco into North Central Health District (11th grade)
Grant/Harney

The following counties have sufficient sample sizes; however, the percentage of sampled students who participated in the survey was relatively low. Although results for these counties are posted, caution should be used when interpreting the results since they may not be representative of the county as a whole.

  • Deschutes
  • Douglas
  • Marion
  • Umatilla
  • Wasco (8th grade)

District Participation by County (pdf)
Source:
public.health.oregon.gov/BirthDeathCertificates/Surveys/OregonHealthyTeens/Pages/2015.aspx

2016 Student Wellness Survey


The Student Wellness Survey (SWS) was introduced in 2010 to assess school climate, positive youth development and the behavioral health of Oregon youth. It is an anonymous, research-based survey of students in grades 6, 8 and 11.

Visit www.oregonpridesurveys.com to find survey data, forms, instructions, and frequently asked questions.

Why should schools participate in the Student Wellness Survey?

Oregon youth spend a large part of their lives in school. Only parents and family are more influential.

Teachers, administrators and school boards work to create a learning environment where all students can thrive.

SWS provides information that can help schools and communities develop plans to support youth and track changes over time.

By tapping into issues associated with school climate, positive youth development, and behavioral health, the survey assesses key factors that influence student success.

What is school climate?

The degree to which students feel they belong, are valued, and are physically and emotionally safe at school

Student qualities such as: attendance, commitment to school, respect for teachers, and feeling safe at school

School qualities such as: supportive teachers, opportunities for participation in class or other activities, and levels of harassment and bullying at school or on the way to or from school.

What is positive youth development?

Youth that feel competent and confident, are involved in the community and have good physical and mental health.

High levels of positive youth development are strongly associated with academic success.

What are behavioral health risks?

Common behavioral risks include: mental health disorders, substance use, problem gambling, and antisocial behavior.

As the number of risks increases, youth become less likely to establish constructive relationships, succeed in school or make a successful transition to the workforce.

Contact Information:

If you have any questions contact:
Healthy Teen Survey
Student Wellness Survey

Renee Boyd
OHT Survey Coordinator
Program Design and Evaluation Services
Oregon Health Authority
Division of Public Health
827 NE Oregon St., Suite 250
Portlaand, OR 97232
renee.k.boyd@state.or.us
Phone: 971-673-1145 or

 

Rusha Grinstead
Oregon Health Authority
Office of Health Analytics
500 Summer St. NE E 86
Salem, OR 97301-118
E-mail:
rusha.grinstead@state.or.us
Phone: 503-602-9214
Fax: 503-378-8467

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