CPR

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CPR Graduation Requirement for California High Schools (AB-1719)
CPR Graduation Requirement for Oregon High Schools
Oregon Senate Bill 79 (2015)

CPR Instruction for grades 7-12

Oregon requires CPR training in schools
Build confidence. Get over fear of legal. Saving lives
The Case Against Mouth-to-Mouth Resuscitation
CPR training before graduation will create generation of lifesavers
CPR In Schools Training Kits
CPR - child (1 to 8 years old)
Saving a Life After Discharge: CPR Training for Parents of High-Risk Children
Children's Cognitive Development and Learning (42 page PDF)
Courses for Kids
WARNING

Real Time Death Toll as of

2:47
2:37
1:30
Be the Beat - Hands-only CPR
CPR Required for Graduation in Michigan featuring ProTrainings
Mama Knows Best Hands-Only CPR Training Video

Oregon requires CPR training in schools


Oregon has become the 23rd state to require students to learn CPR before high school graduation. Gov. Kate Brown signed the new state legislation Wednesday.

Starting in the 2015-2016 school year, Oregon students in grades 7 through 12 will receive CPR training and learn how to use an automated external defibrillator in P.E. or health class. The new law will ultimately equip about 35,000 graduates each year with the lifesaving skill.

“The potential impact of 35,000 trained graduates every year is incredible and will be felt immediately in communities across the state,” said cardiologist Robert Quintos, M.D., a member of the American Heart Association’s Oregon board of directors.

About 326,000 Americans have an emergency medical services-assessed cardiac arrest outside of the hospital each year.

Bystander CPR can increase a person’s chances of survival by two- to three-fold, yet fewer than half receive it, according to the AHA.

Oregon joins 22 other states that have passed school CPR requirements: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington and West Virginia.

CPR in Schools

Learn about Hands-Only CPR

Source: news.heart.org/oregon-requires-cpr-training-in-schools/

Build confidence. Get over fear of legal. Saving lives


Hands on training to save a life. Students in Oregon - required. Teachers and staff -

For some the stigma and stress involved with saving a life can be overwhelming. That's why it's so importnt to build confidence. And the purest form is not that complicated. What the complicated piece is to get that person's confidence point so that when someone hits the floor how do you get them over the fear that legal reprocussions, how do you get them over the fear of hurting someone,

  • CPR required for graduation.
  • Additional training to build confidence
  • Because life matters - slogan for ProTrainings whih has trained over 90M students across the nation.
  • Number of people who die each year from what CPR helps correct. Compared to number of people who die from a suicide attempt.
  • Creating hundreds of thoousands of new rescurers every year.
  • Putting things into context.

Do you know CPR? When do you last take a class in it? If something happens, would you give mouth-to-mouth on the victim?

The Case Against Mouth-to-Mouth Resuscitation


Three recent studies have found that when untrained bystanders perform mouth-to-mouth resuscitation as part of CPR on people who are in cardiac arrest, it does not improve paient survival rates.

In order to help the 92% of cardiac arrest patients who die before reaching the hospital, the American Heart Association (AHA) has traditionally recommended a CPR (for cardiopulmonary resuscitation) protocol that includes chest compressions and mouth-to-mouth “rescue breathing.”

But it turns out that idea of a lip-lock with a stranger makes people uneasy; plus most people don’t know how to do mouth-to-mouth correctly. The AHA estimates that only one-third of the 300,000 Americans who go into cardiac arrest in public each year are given CPR, and theorizes that part of the problem is the mouth-to-mouth obstacle.

In 2008, the AHA began exploring a new protocol in which civilian CPR training consisted of rapid chest compressions only. Now several studies have supported this change, finding that chest-compressions only CPR may not only be more palatable, but more effective at saving patients. The Wall Street Journal reports:

Growing evidence has suggested that skipping the mouth-to-mouth breathing in favor of rapid, chest-only compressions is as effective and easier for non-medical personnel to administer. The latest research, published in the Journal of American Medical Association, showed that chest-only compressions can be more effective than traditional CPR.

“Anybody can do hands-only CPR by pushing hard and pushing fast in the center of a person’s chest,” said Michael Sayre, an associate professor of emergency medicine at Ohio State University and the lead author of an AHA paper in 2008 supporting the use of “hands-only” CPR.

Further, a new study just released by the Arizona Department of Health Services reviewed survival rates and resuscitation care of 4,415 people who collapsed after cardiac arrest from 2005 to 2009. Of these patients, 666 received traditional CPR, including mouth-to-mouth, from a bystander; 849 received chest compressions only; and 2,900 got no aid.

The study measured survival by hospital discharge: 13% heart patients who received chest-only compressions were discharged from the hospital, compared with 7.8% of those who received conventional CPR. Of those who received no resuscitation whatsoever, only 5.2% left the hospital, showing that whether you do mouth-to-mouth or not, doing something is better than doing nothing.

In July, two studies published in the New England Journal of Medicine also supported the case against bystander mouth-to-mouth, even with a trained professional’s guidance. For one of the studies, telephone dispatchers in Seattle and Olympia, Washington, and London instructed bystanders in either chest-compression only CPR or chest compressions with mouth-to-mouth to help cardiac arrest patients: 12.5% of the hands-only group survived, compared with 11% of the traditional CPR group. A second Swedish study used the same methodology and found that in the hands-only group, 8.7% of patients survived for at least 30 days, compared with 7% in the traditional CPR group.

However, hands-only CPR applies only to adults. As the Washington Post noted:

Several experts said … that rescue breathing is essential for children in cardiac arrest, and for people who have suffocated or drowned. That’s because in them breathing stops before the heart, and restoring respiration might be enough to bring them back to life.
Source: healthland.time.com/2010/10/06/the-case-against-mouth-to-mouth%C2%A0resuscitation/

WARNING


May 25, 2017

To The Oregon State Board of Education

Re: Repeal SB79 that requires school districts to provide instruction in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of automated external defibrillators. Declares emergency

BACKGROUND


The State Board of Education has the responsibility of implementing state laws as they concern the state's educational process.

Summary

Requires school districts to provide instruction in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of automated external defibrillators. Declares emergency

Title

Relating to safety instruction provided to students, and declaring an emergency.

History

On January 12, 2015, the introduction and first reading of SB79 was referred to the President's desk. Following 23 additional steps, in the House and Senate, it was signed on June 15, 2015 to become effective July 1, 2015

CONCERNS


Why is this before the board? To consider the request of action to repeal SB79.

What is the current situation? It has been implemented though EBBA First Aid school policy has not been revised by OSBA to include the steps and requirements for the implementation of SB79.

How long has it been in place? Since July 1, 2015

What is prompting the change? The unintentional danger it might bring to preteens and teenagers.

What process was used? Not known besides this action.

Does the board have any areas of discretion? If so, what are they? To ask the legislature to repeal the bill under a declaration of emergency.

Has this been before the board before? If so, what action did the board take? Not to my knowledge.

Why should the board take action to repeal this bill? BOE and ODE and their legal departments can speak on behalf of a repeal since it is their job to insure a safe education for Oregon's children and implementing and requiring a training program in schools that has a great potential for psychological harm should be of concern. A great difference here is that adults (except those in certain professions) have a choice to take or not take a CPR class. Here, Oregon and the Board of Education is not offering that same choice. It's ostensibly a requirement to graduate.

I'm sure a parent can opt their children out of this requirement but without making it clear to parents what the potential is for psychological harm, too many parents will not understand the potential danger and think it's safe.

It endangers the psychological well-being of students under 18 which could remain permanently in their psych if there isn't immediate and continual effort to help the student overcome the trauma of losing a victim of a heart attack. It could become the Eleventh Advance Childhood Experience (ACE)

1. In 2015 there were approximately 750,000 heart attacks of which 633,842 were fatal, 80% of which were over 65 while 92% were over 55. Yet only .00177% were under 25. (Attached.) 

The American Heart Association estimates that only one-third of the 300,000 Americans who go into cardiac arrest in public each year are given CPR. (1)

Further, a study released by the Arizona Department of Health Services measured survival by hospital discharge: 13% heart patients who received chest-only compressions were discharged from the hospital, compared with 7.8% of those who received conventional CPR (which includes mouth-to-mouth). Of those who received no resuscitation whatsoever, only 5.2% left the hospital. (1)

In July, two studies published in the New England Journal of Medicine supported the case against bystander mouth-to-mouth, even with a trained professional’s guidance. For one of the studies, telephone dispatchers in Seattle and Olympia, Washington, and London instructed bystanders in either chest-compression only CPR or chest compressions with mouth-to-mouth to help cardiac arrest patients: 12.5% of the hands-only group survived, compared with 11% of the traditional CPR group. A second Swedish study used the same methodology and found that in the hands-only group, 8.7% of patients survived for at least 30 days, compared with 7% in the traditional CPR group. (1)

However, hands-only CPR applies only to adults. As the Washington Post noted:

"Several experts said … that rescue breathing is essential for children in cardiac arrest, and for people who have suffocated or drowned. That’s because in them breathing stops before the heart, and restoring respiration might be enough to bring them back to life." (1)

If in 90% of the cases the child will fail, tell me the value of SB79 for any person under 18 to have to deal with not only their parent dying in front of them, but being trained to save their life when the chances are incredibly slim (10%), and being left with the trauma for the rest of their life thinking that they may have done something wrong and killed their parent or sibling?

2. There's no school policy developed to instruct schools on how to implement the law. EBBA - First Aid was last updated 1/15/14, well before SB79 was crafted. This policy includes information that

  • First aid will be given by school staff.
  • Designated employees in each building shall hold current first-aid cards.
  • Each school shall have, at a minimum, at least one staff member with a current first-aid card for every 60 students enrolled or an emergency response team per building.
  • Such team shall consist of no less than six persons who hold current first-aid/CPR cards and who are trained

Where is the protocol to include or exclude a trained student to do CPR on another student or adult. What about a student or adult giving mouth-to-mouth CPR to someone K-3?

What protocol is there for the student to deal with the side-effects of losing a fellow student or teacher who they utilized their required training on?

3. SB79 didn't stipulate how to track if a student has completed the hands-on course before graduation so it really doesn't have any teeth. It's more of a feel good bill that may produce little actual action because 92% of the heart attack victims are over 54, and, unfortunately, their action may produce unnecessary trauma to the student who actually feels compelled to step in and help save a life.

Sources:

(1) http://www.healthland.time.com/2010/10/06/the-case-against-mouth-to-mouth%C2%A0resuscitation/

EBBA - http://policy.osba.org/brookings/E/EBBA%20D1.PDF

SB79 - https://legiscan.com/OR/text/SB79/2015

CPR In Schools Training Kits


The American Heart Association's newly upgraded CPR in Schools Training Kit™ enables students to learn the lifesaving skills of CPR in just one class period. Plus, the kit teaches AED use and choking relief. The easy-to-use kit is designed specifically for the needs of schools. The kit’s brand new wheeled bag allows for convenient movement from classroom to classroom and easy storage. It’s also reusable – one kit can train hundreds of people.

Help Create the Next Generation of Lifesavers™

About 90 percent of people who suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests die. CPR, especially if performed immediately, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. Sadly, most of the time it doesn’t happen that way. The American Heart Association wants all students and educators to learn CPR, putting more qualified lifesavers in our communities. The stress-free CPR in Schools Training Kit is designed precisely for educational environments and can be facilitated by anyone. The kit contains everything needed to train 10 to 20 people at once in CPR. Repeat the process to train a class, a grade - or even your entire campus!

How it works

Developed by the American Heart Association, the trusted leader in heart health and education, this kit incorporates the very latest science. Students practice on a manikin while watching skills performed correctly on the DVD, a research-proven way to learn and retain lifesaving CPR skills.

CPR in Schools Training Kit includes

  • 1 wheeled classroom carry bag
  • 10 Mini Anne Plus® inflatable manikins
  • 10 kneel mats
  • 10 individual carry bags
  • 5 practice-while-watching training DVDs
  • 1 hand pump for manikin inflation
  • 2 mesh collection and storage bags
  • 10 replacement airways
  • 50 manikin wipes
  • 10 replacement face masks
  • 10 AED training simulators
  • 1 Facilitator Binder that contains the lesson plan, pre-and- post-test, and additional supplementary material
  • 1 Facilitator Guide

NOTE: DVD has not been updated to reflect 2015 Guidelines; however, guidance for providing necessary science updates to students is provided in the CPR in Schools Lesson Plan

CPRiS Training Kit Course Materials: CPR in Schools Training Kit (15-1044) ISBN: 978-1-61669-497-5

Source: cpr.heart.org/AHAECC/CPRAndECC/Training/CPRInSchoolsTrainingKits/UCM_473191_CPR-In-Schools-Training-Kits.jsp

CPR training before graduation will create generation of lifesavers


All Oregon students will be trained in CPR, thanks to the recently passed state law that requires the lifesaving skill to be taught before graduation. Gov. Brown signed the Senate Bill 79 into law on Wednesday.

“The potential impact of 35,000 trained graduates every year is incredible and will be felt immediately in communities across the state,” said cardiologist and American Heart Association-Oregon Board Member, Robert Quintos.

Every 25 seconds someone has a heart attack and every 39 seconds someone dies of a heart attack. Sadly, most people, almost 90 percent, who experience cardiac arrest outside of a hospital die because they don't receive immediate CPR from someone on the scene. But given right away, Hands-Only CPR can double or even triple a person’s chance for survival, according to the American Heart Association.

Starting in the 2015-2016 school year, school districts will be required to include CPR training in curriculum anytime between grades 7 through 12 in physical education or health education class. Hands-on training for simple CPR can be taught by teachers or community volunteers, and can be accomplished in one class period.

Survivors of sudden cardiac arrest, like Raoul Meekcoms, advocated in the State Capitol for the bill, sharing his story of unexpected collapse and rescue in his Tualatin home. “I am one of the lucky ones,” said Meekcoms. “I survived because my wife Sandra was with me and she knew how to perform CPR. Thanks to her courage and care, I survived that day, but most Oregonians do not. We can save more lives if more people know CPR.”

Advocates from across the state supported the bill, including students, teachers, physicians, hospitals, nurses, and Oregon’s EMS community. Alongside the American Heart Association, were 42 fire departments and EMS organizations, the Oregon Fire Chiefs Association, Legacy Health, the Oregon Chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians, Oregon Health & Sciences University, and the Oregon Nurses Association.

Some local efforts are already at work in Oregon communities—including partnerships with local schools like the Jackson County CPR initiative, led by Medford Fire & Rescue, have trained over 1,205 students, more than half of the seventh graders in the county, in the 2013-14 school year.

The local support has been significant and in addition to Medford Fire & Rescue, includes Jackson County EMS, local chapter of the American Association of Critical Care Nurses, Ashland Fire & Rescue, Jackson County Fire District #3, Asante Health System, local educators and the American Heart Association.

Fire Chief Mike Duyck of the Oregon Fire Chiefs Association advocated for the bill, testifying in the House and Senate. "The passage of Senate Bill 79 empowers Oregon's youth to save future generations of Oregonians who experience a cardiac arrest and might not otherwise survive," said Chief Duyck. "They worked tirelessly alongside adults to advocate for this bill, they prevailed, and now they stand ready to accept the responsibility they have earned and make a difference in the lives of others through hands-only CPR."

Oregon has become the 23rd state to require students learn CPR to graduate high school, joining other states that have passed school CPR requirements, including: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington and West Virginia.

About 326,000 Americans have an emergency medical services-assessed cardiac arrest outside of the hospital each year, and less than 11% survive, according to the American Heart Association.

As Julien Comardelle, a student at West Linn High School, said in his testimony supporting the bill last month: “Anyone can save a life and everyone should know how.”

For more information about CPR in Schools in Oregon, contact: Sarah Higginbotham at the American Heart Association: sarah.higginbotham@heart.org / 503-820-5308
Source: www.thelundreport.org/content/oregon-legislature-passes-%E2%80%9Ccpr-schools%E2%80%9D-bill-save-lives

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