Oregon Healthy Teen Surveys

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Oregon Healthy Teens Surveys (http://public.health.oregon.gov/BirthDeathCertificates/Surveys/OregonHealthyTeens/Pages/index.aspx)

Oregon Healthy Teen Surveys - State
1997
1999
2001
2002
2003
MS
HS
MS
HS
8th s
11th s
8th s
11th s
8th s
11th s
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
8th
11th
8th
11th
8th
11th
8th
11th
8th
11th
2009
2010 w
2011
2012 w
2013
8th
11th
6th/8th/11th *
8th
11th
6th/8th /11th *
8th
11th
2014 w
2015 **
2016 w
2017
2018 w
6th/8th/11th *
8th
11th
6th/8th /11th
8th
11th
6th/8th /11th

Oregon Healthy Teen Surveys - Curry County
2005/6
2007/8
2010 w
2011
2012 w
8th
11th
8th
11th
6th/8th/11th *
8th
11th
6th/8th/11th *
2013 *
2014 w
2015 **
TBD
TBD
8th
11th
6th/8th/11th *
8th
11th
8th
11th
8th
11th

Oregon Healthy Teen Surveys - Azalea and BHHS
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
Azalea
BHHS (r)
Azalea
BHHS
Azalea
BHHS
Azalea
BHHS
Azalea
BHHS
2009 ***
2010 w
2011
2012 w
.2013
Azalea
BHHS
6th/8th
BHHS
Azalea (r)
BHHS
8th, 6th r
BHHS
Azalea
BHHS
2014 w *
2015 **
2016 w
2017
2018 w
8th, 6th r
BHHS
Azalea
BHHS
Azalea
BHHS
Azalea
BHHS
Azalea
BHHS
r - Refused; s - sub-catagory reports only. w - Wellness Survey. * Combined in one report; ** 2015 available in November, 2015.*** - Not chosen;

Why should districts and schools participate in the OHT Survey?

The Student Wellness Survey

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance - United States, 2009 (http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss5905.pdf)

Oregon Healthy Teen Survey Overview - Curry County - 2009

Oregon Healthy Teen Survey Overview - Curry County - 2008

Why should districts and schools participate in the OHT Survey?
Because no curriculum is brilliant enough to compensate for a hungry stomach or distracted mind.

There is a strong, well-established link between health and learning. Supporting kids and addressing health issues such as harassment, substance use and unintended pregnancy can greatly improve their ability to learn and academic success. OHT Survey results can help members of the school community to make data-driven decisions and effefctively address health-related barriers to learning. OHT data can be used for:

  • Tracking student population behavior changes as required by Title IVA, Safe and Drug-Free Schools funding
  • School-wide improvement planning and assessment
  • Curricular decisions
  • Grant writing/reporting
  • Engaging community partners
  • Informing the types of funding opportunities offered by the Oregon Health Authority

Click here to see examples of how OHT data is used to improve the health of Oregon's youth. (http://public.health.oregon.gov/BirthDeathCertificates/Surveys/OregonHealthyTeens/Documents/OHT%20Success%20Stories-final.pdf)

Read more about Oregon Healthy Teens... (http://public.health.oregon.gov/BirthDeathCertificates/Surveys/OregonHealthyTeens/Pages/background.aspx)

About us

Oregon Healthy Teens (OHT) is Oregon's effort to monitor the health and well-being of adolescents. An anonymous and voluntary research-based survey, OHT is conducted among 8th and 11th graders statewide. The OHT survey incorporates two youth surveys that preceded it, the YRBS and the Student Drug Use Survey.

Why does Oregon conduct the Oregon Healthy Teens survey?

OHT is fundamental to ensuring that young people arrive at adulthood with the skills, interests, assets, and health habits needed to live healthy, happy, and productive lives in caring relationships with other people. The information gathered in this survey enables schools and communities to know what proportion of their young people are developing successfully and what proportion is having problems. It allows them to assess whether the things they are doing are improving outcomes for young people.

How does the survey make a difference in youth health and well-being?

Over the past 20 years, research has identified an increasing number of effective approaches to preventing these problems. These include programs and policies that support families, school practices, media interventions, and neighborhood and community-wide efforts. Accurate estimates of the extent of youth problems are essential for knowing which schools and communities need which programs and whether the programs, when implemented, are working.

Oregon Healthy Teens monitors the factors that influence successful development. Research has shown that risk factors and assets that affect young people include family, school, neighborhood, and community characteristics. By measuring these influences as well as youth behavior, the OHT survey provides information to help schools and communities focus on the things that are most important to ensure successful youth development. As we develop a system for monitoring youth well-being, we will become better and better able to ensure that the largest possible proportion of young people achieve its full potential.

What topics are included in the survey?

  • Tobacco, alcohol and other drug use
  • Access to tobacco and alcohol
  • Personal safety behaviors and perceptions
  • Violence?related behaviors
  • Diet and exercise
  • Extracurricular activities
  • Sexual activity and HIV/AIDS knowledge
  • Health conditions and access to care
  • Individual, peer, community and family influences on risk behaviors
  • How are the rights of families protected?

In the weeks prior to the survey, parents/guardians receive a letter asking permission for their student to fill out the questionnaire. The parent or guardian is given the option to refuse consent. In addition, each student has the option to decline the survey, or to skip any question they don't want to answer.

How is the confidentiality of the student protected?

The OHT survey is anonymous; students are not asked for their names. Once the surveys have been completed and collected, there is no identifying information linking a questionnaire to an individual student or parent. In addition, the information reported to the school district is aggregated-it is grouped by grade level and gender, and no individual set of information is identified in these reports.

How long have school-based surveys been used for statewide health monitoring in Oregon?

Historically, two agencies in the Department of Human Services administered two school-based youth surveys on alternating years Oregon: the CDC-based Youth Risk Behavioral Survey (YRBS), administered in odd-numbered years since 1991, and the Student Drug Use survey (including Risk and Protective factor information) in even-numbered years since 1996. While each survey provided data on part of the key indicators for many state and national strategic assessments and plans, a more coordinated approach was needed to help develop consistent, yearly tracking of key indicators, and increase the usefulness of data to local communities and schools.

How do state agencies, local health departments, schools, and other groups use the survey data?

OHT data are used to help evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of projects and programs that promote healthy adolescence in Oregon. They are a key source of state and national leading health indicators, such as those included in the Oregon Benchmarks and Healthy People 2010.

Survey findings serve as a valuable tool for legislators and other policy makers as they make decisions about health related policies, services, programs, and educational activities. Agencies, non-profit organizations, and community groups use the data to provide base-line and evaluation information required for grants and other funding sources, and for planning and evaluating activities and programs that promote health and ability to learn, prevent injury, and reduce high risk behaviors among youth. Many Oregon counties and local communities use OHT survey information in community health assessments.

Many schools and communities use the results from this survey in the process of obtaining Safe and Drug Free Schools funding and other grants to enhance local prevention resources. Obtaining such funding relies on the proven strategy of being able to demonstrate need and provide accountability by measuring outcomes.

Parents, school staff members, and community groups can use the information to identify areas where help is most needed for students to change behavior, and they can use that opportunity to develop and support activities and environments that encourage healthy behaviors.

How do I see the survey questions or results?

All OHT reports going back to 1997, including questionnaires and data tables, are available on our data page . (http://public.health.oregon.gov/BirthDeathCertificates/Surveys/OregonHealthyTeens/results/Pages/ohtdata.aspx)

Contact information:

Renee Boyd, Youth and Adult Surveys Coordinator
Oregon Department of Human Services-Health Services Branch
Office of Disease Prevention and Epidemiology
Center for Health Statistics
eMail (renee.k.boyd@state.or.us)
971-673-1145

Source: public.health.oregon.gov/BirthDeathCertificates/Surveys/OregonHealthyTeens/Pages/index.aspx

The Student Wellness Survey

The Student Wellness Survey (SWS) was introduced in 2010 to assess school climate, positive youth development and the behavioral health of Oregon youth. It is an anonymous, research-based survey of students in grades 6, 8 and 11.

Why should schools participate in the Student Wellness Survey?

  • Oregon youth spend a large part of their lives in school. Only parents and family are more influential.
  • Teachers, administrators and school boards work to create a learning environment where all students can thrive.
  • SWS provides information that can help schools and communities develop plans to support youth and track changes over time.
  • By tapping into issues associated with school climate, positive youth development, and behavioral health, the survey assesses key factors that influence student success.

What is school climate?

  • The degree to which students feel they belong, are valued, and are physically and emotionally safe at school
  • Student qualities such as: attendance, commitment to school, respect for teachers, and feeling safe at school
  • School qualities such as: supportive teachers, opportunities for participation in class or other activities, and levels of harassment and bullying at school or on the way to or from school.

What is positive youth development?

  • Youth that feel competent and confident, are involved in the community and have good physical and mental health.
  • High levels of positive youth development are strongly associated with academic success.

What are behavioral health risks?

  • Common behavioral risks include: mental health disorders, substance use, problem gambling, and antisocial behavior.
  • As the number of risks increases, youth become less likely to establish constructive relationships, succeed in school or make a successful transition to the workforce.

Contact information

If you have any questions about the Student Wellness Survey, contact:

Geralyn Brennan
Oregon Health Authority
Addictions and Mental Health Division
500 Summer St. NE E 86
Salem, OR 97301-118
E-mail (geralyn.brennan@state.or.us)
Phone: 503.947.2319
Fax: 503.378.8467

 
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