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How To Encourage Someone To See A Therapist
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How To Encourage Someone To See A Therapist
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Therapy Prevents Repeat Suicide Attempts
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Man Therapy


Adult men represented approximately three of every four suicide deaths in Utah in 2014. The Utah Suicide Prevention Coalition has launched a statewide campaign to erase the stigma surrounding men’s mental health and to engage men and draw them into the conversation of their own health . Man Therapy™ reshapes the conversation, using humor to cut through stigma and tackle issues like depression, post-traumatic stress, divorce, substance use and even suicidal thoughts head on, the way a man would do it.

Man Therapy™ provides men approaching crisis, and the people who care about them, a place to go and learn more about men’s mental health, examine their own mental health, and consider a wide array of actions that will put them on the path to help, treatment and recovery, all within an easy-to-access online portal at www.mantherapy.org. Visit this page to take the 18-point head test, find local resources, and learn valuable tips about topics like fighter jets, how to make guacamole, and what to do when you or someone you care about is in a crisis.
Source: utahsuicideprevention.org/mantherapy

How To Encourage Someone To See A Therapist


It’s hard to watch someone you care about struggle with their mental health. It’s even worse when you know they could benefit from professional help. Approaching an individual and encouraging them to seek therapy can be a tricky situation. If done the wrong way, you could aggravate the person or turn them against the idea entirely. However, there is an effective way to have this conversation.

Here are some steps you can take to tell your loved one about the benefits of seeking therapy.

Show Support

Misconception about mental health and therapy has intensified stigma in society. Your loved one may be aware that they need help, but may be afraid to seek it if they think you will judge or treat them differently. Therefore, it is essential to use non-stigmatizing language when talking with them about their mental health. Assure them that you will support them through the therapy process.

Demi Lovato is one of the most vocal celebrities about her mental health issues. She mentioned on multiple occasions how important it was for her to have people around that really care about her wellbeing. She credits her support group for being able to go through everyday life. Demi asks for advice from her loved ones and asks them to let her know when they feel something’s off: "So whether it's with my management team or with my friends, every choice that I make, I run by people. And that's what's really helped me—vocalizing what you need."

Be Sensitive To Timing And Place

Talking to someone about mental health requires emotional sensitivity as well as physical sensitivity. The “where” and “how” the topic is presented may determine how a person reacts to your suggestions. Your loved one may not be as bold as Kesha when she shared her condition and struggles with the world while receiving an award.

Don’t start this delicate conversation in front of other people or where others can hear as this may cause discomfort. And avoid grouping up in an intervention-style conversation as people do on TV shows. Allow the person struggling to decide whether they want others to know. This way, they feel respected and in control of their own treatment.

Also: Avoid talking to someone when they are in a bad mood, tired, have tight deadlines at work or if they’re doing something important. They may dismiss you or disregard the weight of the topic. Approach the person when they’re in a good mood, relaxed and undistracted. Try as much as possible to keep the conversation private, friendly and relaxed.

Prepare For Resistance

Not all people who hear about therapy will be willing to try it out. You need to be prepared to make your case if your loved one resists your suggestion. Here are some ideas that you can use to highlight the importance of therapy:

  • Try to use your relationship as leverage, in a loving way. Whether you’re their sibling, friend, spouse or relative, tell them how important your relationship with them is to you. And how it could benefit from their seeking therapy. However, avoid giving an ultimatum as it can cause emotional distress.
  • Name their admirable qualities. It’s easier to appeal to someone by pointing out what you like about them. When you point out someone’s positive qualities, they will be motivated to take the necessary steps to better themselves even further.
  • Explain specific areas of problematic behavior. Most people who refuse therapy may claim that they don’t have a problem. By pointing out specific problems without coming off as judgmental, you can help them see the need for seeking professional help.

Offer To Help

You can try to embolden someone to go to therapy, but unless you are willing to offer meaningful support, it’s not going to encourage them. Some people do not know where to start when seeking help. Guide them in finding a suitable therapist in the area, depending on their preferences. You can contact offices on their behalf or research various professionals, their credibility and reviews.

Some people are scared of seeing a therapist alone or signing up for group therapy. Offer to go with them until they’re comfortable. You can sit in the waiting room during their first few sessions. Make sure to assure them that you won’t ask prying questions about the counseling unless they want to share.

Seeking therapy is one of the best steps that a person with a mental health condition can take. However, it’s an effort that requires great strength and courage. Share your suggestions as openly as possible and leave them to make the decision that best suits their needs. Above all things, assure them of your continued love and support throughout the process.
Source: www.nami.org/Blogs/NAMI-Blog/November-2017/How-to-Encourage-Someone-to-See-a-Therapist

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Want to talk to someone now? We’ll connect you to a listener through our secure network to a compassionate, trained active listener who is online and available to chat. You can also choose a therapist to engage in online therapy. Start a conversation with an available active listener right away.

Choose your own listener

Want to connect with a listener based on life experience or affiliation? Browse or search our listener community to find the right listener or online counselor, someone with whom you feel comfortable chatting. Whether you want listening or online counseling about life, love, relationship problems, stress, depression help, or you just need to vent about your problems, we have an active listener or therapist for you to vent to via anonymous chat.

Get online therapy in your anonymous, private room

7 Cups respects your privacy. Our bridging technology connects you one-on-one to a listener or online therapist while remaining completely anonymous. Our friendly Noni bot will welcome you to your private room where you can get settled and learn a bit more about how you can feel better. Your listener will join you in just a few seconds for a confidential chat.

Connect & Talk to strangers

Learn & grow with the community. Chat with supportive people in group support rooms who have overcome similar challenges. Engage in guided discussions or lighthearted banter. Join conversations about issues and struggles that matter to you in our community forum. Follow positive, kind people you meet at 7 Cups and post about how you are taking care of yourself to your own support network.

Stay emotionally fit and grow with us

Make emotional wellness a daily habit by following your growth path. Reminders and progress along your path can help you get support from trained volunteer listeners and do simple activities on your own to relax, on a regular basis, giving you more control over your own well being.

What is a Growth Path?

Do you need help with your life? 7 Cups is an on-demand emotional health and well-being service. When you need to chat we connect you to a real listener or therapist when you want someone to talk to. When you may not feel ready to chat, you can try simple activities to help boost your mood. Whatever step you take first - chatting one-on-one, doing solo activities, watching short videos, reading self-help guides, forum posts, and uplifting feed posts, or participating in group discussions - starts you on a path that will encourage and support you as you take steps daily to become stronger.

There are many ways to receive support online -- therapy, counseling, coaching, and guidance are among them. New technologies, like those provided through 7 Cups, allow us to offer affordable, convenient, flexible, accessible counseling to fit your individual needs.

What is Online Therapy?

Online therapy is mental health counseling provided via the Internet. Sometimes it is called e-therapy, distance therapy, telehealth, or Internet therapy. Online therapy can be done by texting, video chatting, voice messaging or audio messaging with licensed therapists online.

What about Video Chat Therapy?

While video chat therapy does allow for more accessibility, it does not eliminate some of the key challenges that traditional therapy faces. More and more clients are now opting for message therapy as an even more convenient and affordable solution.

Consider how Online, Message-Based Psychotherapy has the ability to improve upon traditional office-based counseling services

Traditional Therapy

Online Therapy

Location

Must find a local Counselor or Therapist

Can find an expert on your issue, not necessarily based on geography

Accessibility

Must meet in therapist or counselor’s office

Can connect with your therapist from home, work, or wherever is convenient for you.

Availability

Bound to the therapist or counselor’s schedule, and often meet once per week.

Can chat with your therapist anytime--when you truly need it--and, as often as you’d like.

Affordability

Often very expensive, traditional therapy can be as much as $200 per session, and upwards of $800/month.

Significantly cheaper: you pay as little as $37.50/week, or $150 for the whole month of unlimited contact with your therapist.

Visibility

Requires face to face interaction, which can be challenging for some people.

Allows anonymity, and can be accessed privately, without others knowing that you are receiving therapy.

Effectiveness

Equally as effective, but given that it is harder to access, and there are more barriers, remaining consistently in treatment can be challenging.

Studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of online therapy. It gives the added bonus of allowing people to take their time to explore their thoughts, and put them into words.

Why Clients & Therapists Often Prefer Text-Based Psychotherapy:

  • They already enjoy texting, spend a lot of time doing it and feel texting therapy fits that lifestyle.
  • Texting therapy is similar to journaling or keeping a diary.
  • Therapists and clients can take more time to respond to difficult questions or issues.
  • It is easy to look at previous messages and progress. Clients and therapists do not need to take notes.
  • Video chat can still be upwards of $100/session, must be at a scheduled time, and requires the client to find a private place with good internet connection. Message counseling can be done anywhere, anytime, without anyone else knowing, for a much cheaper rate.

Source: www.7cups.com/

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People Who Talk to Themselves Aren’t Crazy, They’re Actually Geniuses


There’s nothing quite like catching weird glances in the halls at work or in the checkout line at the grocery store and realizing that you were talking – out loud – to yourself in public. It’s enough to make you feel a little batty, but if this has ever happened to you…good news!

You’re a genius.

I mean, this should be a no-brainer, right? After all, some of the smartest people in history talk to themselves: poets, writers, philosophers, every one! Even Einstein used to “repeat his sentences to himself softly.”

But now, we have proof. Proof, I say!

A study printed in The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology claims that talking to yourself makes your brain work more efficiently. Authors Daniel Swingley and Gary Lupyan hypothesized that talking to yourself could actually be beneficial. Their first trial, in which they gave subjects an object to buy at the grocery store, seemed to prove their point. The people who were allowed to say the name of the item aloud were much more likely to find it than the ones bound to silence.

It turns out that talking out loud might not always be helpful, though.

“Speaking to yourself isn’t always helping – if you don’t really know what an object looks like, saying its name can have no effect, or actually slow you down. If, on the other hand, you know that bananas are yellow and have a particular shape, by saying banana you’re activating these visual properties in the brain to help you find them.”

Basically, if you know what an object looks like – the banana, for instance – then saying the word will help you find what you’re looking for. But, if you’ve never seen a rutabaga, saying it out loud isn’t going to be of any assistance at all.

Not that you’d ever actually want to find a rutabaga, but in case you do, here’s a picture.

It can be helpful for the indecisive scatterbrains among us.

Talking through things aloud can help organize your thoughts, as well as validate difficult decisions, according to psychologist Linda Sapadin

“It helps you clarify your thoughts, tend to what’s important, and firm up any decisions you’re contemplating.”

I mean, basically, it’s best to talk the big decisions out…even if it’s just with yourself.

Talking to yourself about your goals also helps you attain them.

It turns out saying your goals aloud is even better for achieving them than making a written list, which can seem daunting. As Sapadin says,

“Saying your goals out loud focuses your attention, reinforces the message, controls your runaway emotions, and screens out distractions.”

It’s exactly what we “crazies” who talk to ourselves have always known – we’re smart, and we give great advice. Why not listen to it, out loud and wherever you want!
Source: didyouknowfacts.com/rc-people-talk-arent-crazy-theyre-actually-geniuses/?utm_source=Web&utm_medium=Partner&utm_campaign=AOLHP

Therapy Prevents Repeat Suicide Attempts


Short-term psychotherapy may be an effective way to prevent repeated suicide attempts.

Using detailed Danish government health records, researchers studied 5,678 people who had attempted suicide and then received a program of short-term psychotherapy based on needs, including crisis intervention, cognitive therapy, behavioral therapy, and psychodynamic and psychoanalytic treatment. They compared them with 17,034 people who had attempted suicide but received standard care, including admission to a hospital, referral for treatment or discharge with no referral. They were able to match the groups in more than 30 genetic, health, behavioral and socioeconomic characteristics. The study is online in Lancet Psychiatry.

Treatment focused on suicide prevention and comprised eight to 10 weeks of individual sessions.

Over a 20-year follow-up, 16.5 percent of the treated group attempted suicide again, compared with 19.1 percent of the untreated group. In the treated group, 1.6 percent died by suicide, compared with 2.2 percent of the untreated.

“Suicide is a rare event,” said the lead author, Annette Erlangsen, an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, “and you need a huge sample to study it. We had that, and we were able to find a significant effect.”

The authors estimate that therapy prevented 145 suicide attempts and 30 deaths by suicide in the group studied.
Source: well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/12/01/therapy-prevents-repeat-suicide-attempts/?_r=1

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